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Plan to Remove 1 Mile of Trees along Peachtree and Tanyard Creeks

The Bobby Jones Golf Course Foundation has proposed to remove trees and plants in the state’s 25-foot buffer along one mile of Peachtree and Tanyard Creeks on their golf course redevelopment in Atlanta. The buffer is the protective area of trees and plants adjacent to the stream that filters pollutants, reduces the velocity of runoff, provides shade, habitat and more.

CRK strongly opposes the Foundation’s plan because removing these trees and plants along the streams would be detrimental to stream health and there are alternatives that could avoid these impacts. CRK’s detailed comments on the plan submitted to the state can be found here. We are committed to protecting Peachtree and Tanyard Creeks because of the important functions they serve within the larger river system and we are continuing to offer our expertise in discussions with the Foundation to ensure that these creeks are appropriately protected.

The Foundation began renovating its golf course in the Fall of 2017 and in the process has caused tremendous amounts of dirt to run off the site and pollute the creeks. Dirt (or sediment) is the number one pollutant in Georgia’s waterways, harming fish and wildlife habitat and degrading water quality for downstream users and property owners. This project has already cleared trees and vegetation from the city’s designated 75-foot protective stream buffer.

For news on this issue follow this link to the Saporta Report.

Columbus Utility Rejects State’s Proposal to Improve Quality of Water

Columbus Water Works operates a permitted combined sewer system (CSS), which discharges partially treated sewage combined with stormwater when there is as little as 0.6 inches of rain. The discharges are sent directly into the Chattahoochee River in downtown Columbus near the recently constructed whitewater course, a wildly popular attraction that draws thousands of people each year to the riverfront. CRK is concerned that high levels of bacteria and chlorine from the CSS are harmful to public health, fish and wildlife, and water quality.

The Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has proposed a new, more protective permit with modern monitoring and treatment requirements to address the current problems. Columbus Water Works, however, is seeking to renegotiate the draft permit to weaken the proposed requirements. CRK supports EPD’s proposed permit and is sharing our findings with Columbus stakeholders.  Read CRK’s comments to the EPD on the proposed permit here and follow this link for more information on the Columbus CSS permit.

Support CRK in 2018

With the continued threats our river faces, CRK needs your support now more than ever. Please pledge your support for North Georgia’s most valuable natural resource by becoming a CRK event sponsor. In addition to receiving the satisfaction of knowing that your financial commitment will have a positive impact on the lives of the nearly 4 million people who depend on the Chattahoochee, you will receive a myriad of benefits for what you’re doing to help save our precious river.

 

Community Spotlight

Helping to SAVE DROPS, one rain barrel at a time.  The Coca-Cola Company has played a key roll in our rain harvesting program since its inception in 2009, donating 60-gallon syrup drums which are refurbished and distributed as rain barrels in the community.  We estimate 4 million gallons of water saved since the program started.

Not only has their local support paved the way for rain harvesting partnerships across the nation, it has made a profound impact on other CRK initiatives including our yearly trash cleanups, outings program, floating classroom, and green infrastructure projects. A special THANK YOU to our friends at Coca-Cola for continuing to give back to your hometown communities!