Blog2019-08-30T12:21:47-04:00

Chattahoochee Riverkeeper Solves Sediment Pollution of Oseligee Creek

In October of 2018, during a routine drone flyover of the Chattahoochee River, CRK staff  noticed something unusual in Oseligee Creek, just northwest of West Point, Ga. A large plume of muddy water was flowing into the Chattahoochee River upstream of the drinking water intake for the City of West Point, who had earlier noted problems in its drinking water treatment caused by excessive sediment in the water. CRK tracked the source of sedimentation upstream to a 1,100-acre construction site in Lafayette, Al. Our further investigation revealed the site was being converted from timber land to a large-scale solar installation owned [...]

By |May 21st, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

On the lake with Chattahoochee Riverkeeper

After weeks of being cooped up inside during the initial onset of the global pandemic, Headwaters Director Dale Caldwell took advantage of a beautiful spring day to get out on Lake Lanier, collect some water samples, and check up on the health of this important waterway. Here’s what he saw: After months of abundant rainfall in the region, we continue to observe navigational hazards in the form of large vegetative debris in both the Chattahoochee and Chestatee River channels, and the main body of Lake Lanier. With heavy rains also comes trash from stormwater runoff. Three-dimensional flow and the [...]

By |May 14th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , |0 Comments

The Future of the Water Wars: Spring 2020 Update and CRK’s Take

For 30 years, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida have fought over the use of water in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACF), which is heavily influenced by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ operation of Lake Lanier’s Buford Dam. Lake Lanier lies within the Chattahoochee’s headwaters, just north of Atlanta. On December 11, 2019 and in the most recent “water wars” episode, a Special Master issued a recommendation to the U.S. Supreme Court in the Florida v. Georgia legal case. In plain terms, the recommendation says the court should drop Florida’s latest volley. In legal terms, Florida failed to make a compelling legal argument [...]

By |April 17th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: |0 Comments

On Patrol: Our Programs at Work

While CRK’s group cleanups and public events are postponed, staff is still busy collecting water samples, picking up litter, and holding polluters accountable. Here are four programmatic projects undertaken in the last year, each a great example of the kind of work we do everyday to protect the Chattahoochee River. Exxon Spill A Hotline caller alerted CRK that an underground fuel tank at the Exxon station on West Paces Ferry was leaking into Nancy Creek. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) immediately responded by requiring the station owner to contain the flow of gasoline into the creek and seek [...]

By |April 6th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Clean Water Keeps People Healthy, so We’re Still Hard at Work.

Like people across the world, CRK is closely monitoring the situation surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. While we’ve instituted teleworking for our staff, postponed our annual Sweep the Hooch cleanup to August 29, and put many of volunteer programs on hold, we’re still working diligently to ensure that the water people depend on for hand washing and more stays protected. Even though we may not be able to be together in person, there are still plenty of ways to get involved and make sure our river stays safe: Stay in touch.  Our staff will continue to protect the watershed, but [...]

By |March 25th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , |0 Comments

Three Dams on the Chattahoochee to be Removed

In late 2018, Southern Company and Georgia Power announced plans to surrender their Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licenses to generate hydropower at the Langdale, Crow Hop and Riverview dams on the Chattahoochee River in Valley, Alabama. At the end of this public process, the dams—three of six located between West Point and Columbus—will be partially or completely removed. Why does Georgia Power want to remove dams? At the top of the list: the low head dams—built in 1906 to power nearby factories—have outlived their purpose. The West Point Manufacturing Company initially built the structures and powerhouses but sold the [...]

By |March 25th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |0 Comments