Blog2019-08-30T12:21:47-04:00

Georgia Power’s Dangerous Legacy Along the Chattahoochee

Coal ash is what’s left behind after burning coal to produce electricity, and it’s toxic. For decades, Georgia Power has allowed more than 80 million tons of this waste to accumulate at coal-fired power plants across the state. Toxic coal ash contains dangerous heavy metals and carcinogens, including some that have been linked to negative human health impacts. If left unaddressed, approximately 50 million tons of toxic coal ash will be left in unlined pits near Georgia rivers; 30 million tons of which will be along the Chattahoochee, threatening water supplies and aquatic life around Plant McDonough-Atkinson in Cobb [...]

By |September 2nd, 2021|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Legislative Update (Summer 2020)

Each year, Chattahoochee Riverkeeper joins its partners in the Georgia Water Coalition to advocate for our shared waterways before the Georgia General Assembly. CRK spends time at the Capitol advocating for new laws that will protect our environment and fighting against rollbacks that will degrade our water quality. Despite the impacts of the pandemic and unusual pace of the session, the 2019-2020 legislative session was one of the most successful yet for the CRK team. Below is a brief rundown of our biggest successes in 2020. Coal ash legislation passes Since 2015, CRK has advocated for greater protections for [...]

By |October 12th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |1 Comment

What do our trash traps really trap? Chattahoochee Riverkeeper takes a deep dive into the effectiveness of in-stream Litter Gitters

Nearly everyone that has ventured into our region’s recreational areas has noticed a bit of trash around trails and parking lots; but what many fail to realize is that trash littered on land will inevitably make its way into our storm drains and on toward our rivers and lakes. Approximately one year ago, Chattahoochee Riverkeeper launched our first in-stream trash collecting device designed to filter and stop garbage from making its way into the Chattahoochee River. Now, our 12-month Litter Gitter Pilot Program has come to an end, and the results may have important implications for our watershed and [...]

By |October 2nd, 2020|Categories: Blog|1 Comment

Unusual legislative session yields victories for Georgia’s environment

Each year, Chattahoochee Riverkeeper joins its partners in the Georgia Water Coalition (GWC) to advocate for Georgia’s waterways before the Georgia General Assembly. We spend time at the Capitol advocating for new laws that will protect our environment and fighting against rollbacks that will degrade our water quality. We lobby our legislators and engage our members to use their voices to reach their own lawmakers. Below is a brief rundown of our biggest successes in 2020. Coal ash legislation passes! Since 2015, CRK has been advocating for greater protections for our waterways against the threats posted by toxic coal [...]

By |July 9th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Chattahoochee Riverkeeper Solves Sediment Pollution of Oseligee Creek

In October of 2018, during a routine drone flyover of the Chattahoochee River, CRK staff  noticed something unusual in Oseligee Creek, just northwest of West Point, Ga. A large plume of muddy water was flowing into the Chattahoochee River upstream of the drinking water intake for the City of West Point, who had earlier noted problems in its drinking water treatment caused by excessive sediment in the water. CRK tracked the source of sedimentation upstream to a 1,100-acre construction site in Lafayette, Al. Our further investigation revealed the site was being converted from timber land to a large-scale solar installation owned [...]

By |May 21st, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

On the lake with Chattahoochee Riverkeeper

After weeks of being cooped up inside during the initial onset of the global pandemic, Headwaters Director Dale Caldwell took advantage of a beautiful spring day to get out on Lake Lanier, collect some water samples, and check up on the health of this important waterway. Here’s what he saw: After months of abundant rainfall in the region, we continue to observe navigational hazards in the form of large vegetative debris in both the Chattahoochee and Chestatee River channels, and the main body of Lake Lanier. With heavy rains also comes trash from stormwater runoff. Three-dimensional flow and the [...]

By |May 14th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , |0 Comments